Rev. Z. Broadous, Sr.

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Z. (Zachrah) Broadous was born June 30th, 1871 to the parentage of Edmond and Mary Winn in Webster Parish, L.A. and was one of nine children.

By all accounts Zack grew up, farmed, attended whatever school was available in that day and time, perhaps not getting a great deal of schooling, but enough to know its values and to instill in his children a strong desire to get an education. Then as now, an education was a way out of the poverty and hardships that beset those without it.

Accounts given by cousin Henry Banks say that Edmond Banks was a “frock coat” man, a man with land and property, a man to be admired. Aunt Honey’s account of their father also tells of his owning vast acres of land.

Zack’s mother, Mary Winn, a slave, from Jamaica was considered a “much right woman” this information is from Delores Marshall, Uncle Hutch’s granddaughter. Mary Winn’s mother, Fannie Harvey, and her brother Willie lived in Webster Parish and moved to Texarkana about the same time or soon after Zack moved his family of five to Arkansas. They lived down the lane from the Z. Broadous family when they were living on the “Old Place”.

Zack wooed and won the hand of Mattie Thomas. He farmed in Louisiana before moving his family to Arkansas where he bought land, farmed, and preached the gospel. His call to the ministry had to begin early before he left Louisiana. As a circuit rider ( preacher with several churches miles apart) he traveled throughout the width and breathe of Arkansas and Louisiana.

There were good years and lean years but the abiding faith that he had in God carried him through many toils and snares. His dreams included not only his immediate family, but people in general, especially blacks. He wanted for them the better things of life: good schools, better homes, recreational facilities.

He was a good farmer, there were farm products that he shared with his neighbors as well as tools and farm animals. A disastrous fire destroyed the home where many of his children were born and for a while the family stayed in a two room log cabin until the new place was built.

It was at the new place that grandchildren began to come and visit. To tell of his efforts as a mediator, settling disputes between neighbors, stopping lynch mobs, aiding anyone that needed his assistance would take pages, but it is a story that must be told. His death was not only a blow to his family, but to his community and the states of Arkansas and Louisiana.

 


Mrs. Mattie Thomas Broadous

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Mattie Thomas Broadous, born 1876 in Webester Parish, LA. Was one of the eight children born to Warren and Elmira Thomas.

Mattie was pioneer woman in every sense of the word, a wife and mother who followed the dictates of her husband with a quiet inner reserve, a prayerful woman, a saint.

She was a mother who bore 19 children, nurtured them, lost 3 of them, grieved for them, but lived for those left by our Heavenly Father; raised her children to adulthood and helped with the rearing of grandchildren.

She had hard spells of sickness more than once that threatened to take her life, but she was a survivor.

Her home, family, and church were her life. When her sister Sarah needed her, she sent for her, kept her as long as she would stay. It was this outpouring of herself when there was someone in need, and there was always someone in need, that characterized her life.

Farm life was never easy, yet she performed every task as if it was a ritual. Every season had its chores, and each had to be done so that the chores from the next season can be carried out on time.

You were taught to cook, to sew, to wash, to iron, to patch, to can, to gather in the harvest, to lay by food for the winter, to plant in the Spring, to tend the stock, to administer to the sick and needy, and to serve God. Not necessarily in the order given.

For years and years she carried out these tasks, and when her family insisted she and Papa move into town, she resisted the move. After his death she insisted on moving to the Deloney Place out of the projects where she could have at least chickens to tend.

A ritual of family tradition was usually carried out as soon as a child could crawl and discern objects. Three objects were placed where the child could see them. Sometimes the objects were money, a book, or food. If the child chose the book he or she was sure to be a teacher or preacher. If the child picked the money, he or she was sure to be successful at making money.. If the child picked the food, he or she was going to stay close to the land to raise that food.

Hers too was a legacy of love!


Mary Elizabeth Broadous

Mary Elizabeth Broadous, the first born of Rev. Z and Mrs. Mattie Thomas Broadous, was born in 1895. She was a saint by all accounts from the brothers and sisters who remember her.

She grew up in Louisiana and Arkansas, attended school and taught school in the Harrison Chapel Community. What knowledge she gained she brought back and taught to the children in the community and her own brothers and sisters.

She was a devout Christian, She taught Sunday School,and sang in the choir. Her religious affiliation was with the church her Father organized after moving to Texarkana. Mary worked wherever needed, tending family members and others..

Her sister Mattie said, “she spoiled me something awful, she’d let me do what I wanted too, because I was the baby of the first set of children and brother Z was the oldest of the second set of children” Brother Z remembers sister Mary gathering cornstalks in the fields with other family members. It was extremely cold and fire had been made to keep warm by. Sister Mary’s sack caught fire and she was severely burned on her back and side. When she went back to attend the Agricultural Mechanical and Industrial Academy, whose principal was Professor Scott, she caught what was called the eight day pneumonia and died.

Mattie remembers that sister Mary was engaged to be married, but she died before he returned from serving the country during World War I.

Hillery said, “I was quite small when Sister Mary Elizabeth passed away in 1918. She was a student/teacher at the Association’s Academy. Pneumonia was the cause of her death. I remember Papa coming home and telling Mama about Sister’s death. I recall Mama’s reaction….I remember that Mama was in bed and was unable to go to the funeral because she had just given birth to one of the sets of twins.

I remember a childish question that I asked Mama, “Mama, is Papa going to have Rev. Scott put in jail for killing sister?” Mama replied, “No son, Sister was not killed, the Lord took her.”

.

 


Rebecca Broadous Davis Anderson

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Rebecca Broadous Anderson the second child born in 1896 to Rev. Z. and Mattie Thomas Broadous was nicknamed “Doll” because she resembled a delicate doll with fine features, small hands and feet, neat, and dainty. Her sister Mattie Bell said, “She loved pretty things and was as ‘neat as a pin’ her room, her clothes, and all her possessions, such as they were, were kept in ‘apple pie’ order.”

Papa use to tease Doll. She would painstakingly make up her bed smoothing out every wrinkle, plumping up pillows, spreading the counterpane just so, then Papa who had been watching her would jump right in the middle of the bed, much to her chagrin, she’d scream for Mama who would scold him and she’d have to make up the bed all over again.

Rebecca and Mattie Bell roomed and boarded on Laurel Street and attended Laurel Street School in “town” (Texarkana). Rebecca who was several grades ahead of Mattie would return to the community to teach each season.

When Nealie and Leonard moved to St. Louis, Doll followed. It was in St. Louis that Rebecca worked, met and married Luther Davis. To this union two children were born, Judson L. Davis in August, 1925, and a baby girl who died as an infant.

Because times were not good and jobs hard to come by, Rebecca left the baby Judson with Mama and Papa. There was a second child on the way and the marriage was in trouble so it was on the farm where Judson grew up with her sisters and brothers while she worked and sent money for clothing and his keep.

It was in St. Louis that Rebecca, years later, met and married Steve Anderson who was a railroad man and sent for her teenage son. Her marriage to Steve was tranquil and serene as her marriage to Luther had been turbulent.

Her deep religious convictions and up-bringing stood her in good stead for without it she could not have made it through those trying times.

The house on Market Street was a haven for her sister Mattie and Mattie’s three children who visited in August, 1937; for her sister Lee Omia and her brother Therman that she guided and worried and prayed for. It was Therman she went home from the hospital to fix a favorite meal for.

It would take reams to tell how much she loved that “only child” Judson and the love she showered on her brothers and sisters before she left home, especially Lee Quincy.

Rebecca’s religious affiliation began at home, culminated with her membership, over a number of years, at Lively Stone Pentecostal Church, Bishop P.L Scott, pastor. She was an Eastern Star.


Nealie Broadous Owens

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Nealie Broadous Owens was the third child born August 2, 1899, in Plain Dealing, La. To Rev. Z and Mrs. Mattie Thomas Broadous. Nealie who adored her father was the son he didn’t have. She worked harder than any of his children to please him.

She shared his dream of owning the land. Jane, for that was the nickname she was given, was blessed with great wisdom, but not a lot of formal education.

She was married to Leonard Owens in 1918. They lived in the Harrison Chapel Community for a while where their first child, a girl, Trebbie D. was born August, 1921.

Later they moved to McCowan Dairy in the Rondo Community where Leonard was employed and their second daughter, Lucile was born in 1922, November 3. In the early part of 1923 the family moved to East St. Louis, where Leonard secured a job with the Missouri-Pacific Railroad and their third daughter, Ruby was born November 23, 1923, still another child was born, a son, Leonard, Jr who lived only 9 months.

Nealie went back to Texarkana in 1925 to be with her family and give birth to their second son W.T., born January 25, 1925. She was quite ill and stayed in Texarkana longer than she had planned, but returned to East St. Louis and entered the three girls in school.

J.D., her second son to survive was born in 1928 and was the baby when Nealie and Leonard moved back home in 1929 and moved in with her parents. The children entered school. Trebbie 3rd grade, Lucile 2nd grade, Ruby first grade. The Owens family movedinto Leonard’s mother’s place on the Dooley-Ferry Road.

In 1931 another son, A.B. was born and lived only seven months. Leonard and Nealie farmed the first few years that they were back in Texarkana but Leonard left to take a job out of town. He was in and out and Vernell was born March, 1934.

If ever a person lived and taught what they preached Nealie did. Cleanliness was next to Godliness in her book and there were very few times when you’d go to her house and not find everything in order and her children clean. She instilled in them cleanliness, godliness, and strong worth ethics.

It was Nealie the other brothers and sisters compensated because she quit her job to look after their aged parents when they could no longer look after themselves. When her parents passed on she moved to Portland, Oregon, but not before she worked and bought a home in town.

Nealie’s Christian upbringing was deeply rooted in the teachings of her parents. Her affiliation with the Harrison Chapel Baptist Church is a foregone conclusion. She was a staunch member of Rose Hill Baptist Church in Texarkana.

Nealie departed this life in 1966 leaving a legacy of love.

 


Mattie Belle Broadous Flake

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Mattie Belle Broadous Flake was born the sixth child of Rev. and Mrs. Z. Broadous Sr. in Hortman, La., Aprill 22, 1900. She remembers moving from Louisiana to Texarkana in two covered wagons. The family stopped over night with friends and she remembers how the lady of the house asked if she could have her to keep as her own little girl and how frightened she was that her Mother would give her away. She was so relieved when they started on their journey again.

She remembers having to babysit the other children younger than she was especially the twins Albert and Almon who were as large as she was and gave her a hard time. “ Big” and “Buddy” the first of three sets of twins born to Rev. and Mrs. Z Broadous were the hardest of the children to watch.

Mattie attended Laurel Street School like her sister’s Mary Elizabeth and Rebecca. She pleaded with her father to let her go to school in Marshall where her brother Z was attending school and announced that she was going to run away from home and marry a young man named Judge Dunbar if she didn’t get to go to school in Marshall. Papa consented to let her go.  

It was at Central High School that she met Otis Flake who asked her to marry him. She told him he would have to ask Mamma and Pappa. She was in school a year or so when she got sick and her Mother came and took her home. Otis followed them to Texarkana and asked her parents if she could marry him and they gave their consent. Her stipulation before she would marry was that she had to have a house like one of the cottages she saw being built for students at Pine Bluff College in Pine Bluff, Arkansas.

He consented and began building the house. It was nearly finished when they were married in 1925. The Rev. S. Nixon performed the ceremony in the large hall at home in Texarkana. Because the house was not quite finished they lived with Ethel Massie Fuller’s mother Aunt Carrie Massie who was a relative of Otis’. The address of the new house was 1604 University Ave. the same Avenue where Wiley College is located (one of her children would attend Wiley years later).

Their first child Opal Lee was born October 7, 1926; Mary Elizabeth (who died in infancy) November 1928; Otis Leon Jr. was born January 28th, 1929; and Hugh Bernard Anderson Flake born November 23, 1930.

After their house was destroyed in a fire in 1933, the family moved to Fort Worth after Mattie sold the only cow she had and other possessions to pay for fare for her and the children. The children were enrolled in Cooper Street School.

Mattie began working for a number of families, as she had done before she left Marshall. She baked pies so well she was known as “the pie lady”. After numerous other moves all on the Southside of Fort Worth, Mattie and Otis bought a house from a realtor on the corner of Annie and New York Streets for their family. Tragedy struck again when the house was bombed by whites that did not want the family to move into the neighborhood. They bought another house in 1940. Mattie and Otis were separated and divorced in 1942. Here struggles were legendary as she raised her children and worked to feed, clothe, and shelter them. She watched them grow up, finish high school, marry, attend college, and serve in the military.

Mattie Belle’s Christian experiences began early in life. She remembers her father using a syrup barrel for a pulpit and logs for pews when he organized Harrison Chapel Baptist Church in the Harrison Chapel community after they moved to Texarkana. She remembers joining the church and attending Sunday school and when she moved to Marshall she and her brother Z joined Ward Chapel A.M.E Church because it was close to where they lived and “you weren’t Papa’s child if you didn’t belong to church”. When she moved to Fort Worth she joined Baker Chapel A.M.E Church and was a faithful member.

Mattie Belle Broadous Flake served the church and community in many different capacities throughout her life. She worked on the Senior Women’s Usher Board at Bethel A.M.E and sponsored a Junior Girls Usher Board there as well. She was active in the Amy Bradford Missionary Society, and the Corrine Griffin Missionary Society. She was President of the Southside Homemakers Club; She was Vice President of Tarrant County Homemakers Council; She was devotionary chairman of Peter Smith Hospital Auxiliary; also a member of Fort Worth Usher’s Union and a Life member of the Tarrant County Black Historical and Genealogical Society.

 


Z. Broadous, Jr.

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Reverend Z. Broadous Jr. born the 7th child to Rev. Z and Mrs. Mattie Thomas Broadous was considered the oldest child in the second set of children born to this couple. “Son”, as he was called grew up helping on the farm as did all the children. It was a sun up ‘til sundown proposition when he was old enough to help.

He attended the community school as did his other siblings, but had a yearning to go “off” to school. Z kept asking Papa to let him go away to Marshall to Bishop College. Papa allowed him to go. He first attended Central High School then Bishop College. In Marshall he had to support himself for there was very little money that could be spared for his education. One of the jobs he had was a blacksmith attached to Battery F. 132 Field Artillery Company.

Z worked, looked out for himself and his sister Mattie. He earned the honor of being Salutatorian of his graduating class at Central High School and entered Bishop College where he finished with honors. During his time at Bishop College, he met and married Harriette Hackett and to this union two daughters were born; Zelna, and Z Ann. Following this marriage he married his second wife Mrs. Mildred Stewart Broadous.

He studied for the ministry and his first call was to New Bethel Baptist Church in Marshall, TX. The former pastor had been called to pastor a church in Dallas, and young Z became New Bethel’s interim pastor.

Rev. Z Broadous Jr. pastored New Bethel for more than two years and in 1937 was called to pastor Plastine Baptist Church in Victoria, Texas in which he served for over 40 years.

Z’s accomplishments are numerous and include an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree and an honorary Doctor of Law degree.


Albert Broadous

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Albert (A.B) Broadous, one of the first set of twins born to Rev. Z and Mrs. Mattie Thomas Broadous in Texarkana, A.B was nicknamed “Big”. Albert was born with a desire to overcome and better his living conditions. His education in his community and his trips with papa, his work with 4-H Clubs and Short- Courses taken kindled a desire that led him to Arkansas Baptist College.

A.B. says he wandered around looking for the college for quite a while before he stopped and asked where it was located, and was told by the college president’s son that he was standing right in the middle of it. Albert and this young man became fast friends, a friendship that endured over many years.

It was at Arkansas Baptist that A.B. met Mildred, his wife of over fifty years. They take great pride in their only child, Marion Broadous Simpson, and their two granddaughters Sharon and Valerie.

It was hard work and perseverance that saw him through turbulent times. His outstanding work as a cook for the railroad is known throughout these United States.

A churchman, born and bred as attested to by the number of years he has served in his church the Mount Zion Baptist Church in Little Rock, Arkansas. With Mildred as a helpmate, A.B. says, “ how can I go wrong”. Their home has been a haven for his siblings on their way up the ladder.

As President Emeritus we salute you in your untiring efforts to help us keep our feet in the path of righteousness.


Almon Broadous

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Almon, the other twin of the first set of twins born to Rev. Z and Mrs. Mattie Thomas Broadous was named after her brother Almon. “Buddy”, as he was called, was the younger of the twins and the second child to take the land as papa dreamed for all of his children. A true farmer was he. It was rich bottom land that Buddy farmed.

He met and married Lorraine and to this union one child (Almon Jr.) was born. A house was built on ten acres of land for Buddy and his family, but they moved to the “bottom” where rented land planted in cotton was under cultivation.

Almon was the last of the children to leave the farm and then he moved to the house that was “the new place” to town. A.B. tried to get Buddy to go to Little Rock to live on more than one occasion, but the love of home wouldn’t allow him to leave.

After moving to town he began working for Lone Star Ordinance plant and Almon started preaching the year the reunion was held in Texarkana 1979. His wife Lois and her children were the joy of his life. A family man from start to finish, Buddy enjoyed grandchildren and great grandchildren and in this respect he was his father all over again.


Jessie Broadous Manus

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Jessie L. Broadous Manus, born the tenth child to Rev. Z and Mrs. Mattie Thomas Broadous. Jessie was born in Texarkana, Arkansas. She grew up in the family with 17 siblings.  Jessie attended Hardy Elementary School in Texarkana, where she later taught. Her other teaching experiences included Ashdown, Sevier County, Emerson, and Columbia County. Here she met and married Jodie Manus and their only daughter Marvis was born.

Jessie’s church and religious affiliation include, Harrison Chapel Baptist Church where she grew up and taught Sunday school for many years. After marrying, Jessie and Jodie lived in Emerson, then Portland, OR. She was the first president of the Alaska Pacific Conference Missionary Woman Annual Conference of the 9TH Episcopal District for 9 years. Twelve years as District President of the Texarkana, Oregon, Washington, Utah, and Alaska districts. She was also Youth Fellowship Leader. She is a member of Stewardess Board #1 of Allen Temple C.M.E Church. She was president of this board twenty years.

 

“Jodie and I have been husband and wife for 52 years”, she proudly says. All these years have not been sunshine, but who said they would be? There are sweet and bitter in all walks of life, but face life as it comes, with your trust in God.


Beatrice Broadous Wilbon

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Beatrice Broadous Wilbon is the eleventh child born to Rev. Z and Mrs. Mattie Thomas Broadous. Beatrice was born in Texarkana, in the rural community of Harrison Chapel. She grew up in the home with her siblings, adhearing to the rules and regulations of the home as set forth by her parents. Like the other children, “Bea” would milk the cows morning and evening. She would take one of the other sisters to help her sometime. She was concerned about the younger members of the family, Often you would find her playing school “Mom”, teaching them how to act and reading the text books that were used in the Public School.

Beatrice’s favorite chore or hobby was starching and ironing shirts. She took great pride in doing these shirts, especially her Papa’s shirts. Three things were a must at her house as she recalls, “You must go to church, you must go to school, and you must work”. Beatrice did all three. She grew up in the family church organized by her father. She served as Sunday school secretary and teacher. She also sang in the choir.

She was her father’s secretary, assisting him in organizing a benefit called NBIA, Negro Benevolence Industrial Association. She was her father’s personal secretary during his tenure as moderator of the Ozan District Association.

Beatrice attended Hardy Elementary School in her community; Booker T. Washington High, Dunbar High, and Arkansas Baptist College in Little Rock. She taught elementary school in Ashdown, Arkansas. Beatrice left Arkansas and moved to St. Louis in 1940. She met and married Rev. Daniel Wilbon that same year. Their three children are Gwendolyn, Daniel, and Eleanor. There are several grandchildren. She was a member of Northern Missionary Baptist Church.

Beatrice served twelve years as President of W.M.U. She was also a Sunday school teacher, president of the Willing Workers Chorus, Antioch Ministers Wives and Widows. She served as vice-president of the Minister’s Wives of St. Louis Progressive District Association; Director of Youth Department of the Progressive State Convention; Chairman of Fundraising for the Progressive State Camp. She also served as chairman for Foreign Mission of the Progressive State Convention and raised $5,000.

Beatrice was also a Licensed Practical Nurse.


Hillery Broadous

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Reverend Hillery Talbert Broadous, was the 13th of the nineteen children born to the parentage of the late Reverend Z. and Mrs. Mattie Thomas Broadous. He was born on January 5, 1912 in Texarkana, Miller County, Arkansas. H.T or Hillery as he was called, grew up on the farm plowing’ the fields, milking cows and growing hogs and beef.

H.T. came from a family of preachers, born and reared in the home of a Baptist Preacher, five uncles who are preachers, and four brothers who are successful preachers and pastors. They worked in District, State, and National Conventions.

He attended the Hardy Elementary School in Miller County, Arkansas. In May 1972 Morris Booker conferred the honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity upon him. He was also a product of Reed’s Bible College of Religion of Los Angeles, and Los Angeles Valley College of Van Nuys, where he majored in Psychology and Religion. He has also done accredited work through correspondence courses from other schools of religion.

He served over two years in the United States Army, doing 18 months of overseas duty. He rose to the rank of Sergeant (T4).

He and his family have been residents of Pacoima more than 32 years. He has been intensively active in PTA groups, other school programs and community affairs. He has been before County, City, State, and National Government officials on behalf of the community on many occasions. He has helped organize, and served with many community groups and service clubs, throughout the San Fernando Valley and Southern California.

He helped organize and served on the Board of the Fair Housing Council of the San Fernando Valley. Helped organize and incorporate Joint Venture of the San Fernando Valley, a project to pull together Federal Programs for the San Fernando Valley. He also helped organize the San Fernando Valley Interfaith Center Council. He was also the founder and pastor of the Calvary Baptist Church of Pacoima.

In 1960, he led a community group in getting the City Parks and Recreation to purchase the park site at Filmore and Dronfield. In 1965 he led a community group in getting the park partially developed, when the Department of Parks and Recreation said emphatically that there were no funds available. Pastor Broadous was instrumental in getting Parks and Recreation to find more than $60,000 to develop the park. Also in 1965, during the Watts Riot, he led the community in an effort to keep down the attempted riots in Pacoima, which resulted in only a minimum amount of destruction.

He served on the Mayor’s Council for International Visitors; The Mayor’s Advisory Committee for San Fernando Valley; President of the Inter-Denominational Ministerial Group of Pacoima; President of the Pacoima-Panorama Ministerial Association; VP of the Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress of the Western Baptist State Convention of California. Because of limited space I cannot mention the forty or more offices and memberships he has held.

He had the distinct privilege of being the invited guest for the African National Baptist Assembly, which had a membership of over 18,000. He has to his credit two Baptist Churches which he organized and built. Mt. Zion, Lucerne Valley, California, where he was Pastor Emeritus at Calvary Baptist Church in Pacoima. 

H.T was married to Mrs. Rosa Lee (Thompson) Broadous. To this union 11 children were born. They all grew up in Pacoima. H.T was known throughout California and the Southwest for his leadership and support of the Black Community and many civic and educational causes.

 

 


S. Q. Broadous

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S.Q Broadous the twelfth child of the nineteen children born to the parentage of the late Rev. Z and Mrs. Mattie Thomas Broadous was born in Texarkana, Miller County, Arkansas. He grew up in the home with his brothers and sisters in the rural community of Harrison Chapel.

Like the other members of the family S.Q worked in the field. Farming was a way of life as well as a mean of sustaining life. He recalls how they would be up at 4:00 A.M getting the morning chores done, and the girls would be cooking and cleaning the house before they went to the fields.

The family raised most of the food they ate on the farm. It was a good life, we all had fun together, and we were taught through God’s word the love of God and our love for him.

We always had family devotion on Sunday morning, and family prayer, every day, morning, and evening, says S.Q. He was raised in the Harrison Chapel Baptist Church, “ Papa he says organized this church and pastored it for a time”. It was here that I met Jesus and gave my life to him”. S.Q. worked in the Sunday school, B.T.U., and sung in the choir.

S.Q attended the Hardy Elementary School in his community. He is also a product of Morris Booker Memorial College, Dermott, Arkansas. He spend 8 years in Civil Service and the Army. He was also Executive Board Member of Portland NAACP for 12 years. He spend 14 years as president of the Portland District S.S. and Ushers Congress.

S.Q.’s wife and mother of his two older children Lavel and S.Q Jr, passed away in 1951. He later married Ernestine McGhee Broadous and had two children with her whose names are Melvin and Mary. These make up a beautiful loving family.

If you want to see faith in action just take a look at S.Q’s life, he was a man of hope. Like Paul says, “ Forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus. He has an abiding love in Christ, and for his family and church.


Lee Quency Broadous Green

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Lee Quency Broadous Green was the 14th child of the 19 children born to Rev. Z and Mrs. Mattie Thomas Broadous. Lee Quency was born November 17th, 1914 in the rural community of Harrison Chapel. She grew up in the home with her 17 brothers and sisters.

Though the family ties were strong and much love existed in the home, she had a special kind of love for her elder sister Rebecca. “We called her Doll. She would play with me, let me help her cook, carry me places with her, talk to me and always made me feel like I was somebody, and I liked that” Lee Quency recalled. She also recalls the farm, where she and her siblings planted and grew crops. Picked and canned vegetables, and milked the cows.

Everybody in the household attended church. Her father organized the only church in their community, Harrison Chapel Baptist Church. She accepted Christ and was baptized by Rev. W.C. Howell. She served as a choir member, usher, and Sunday school teacher.

She attended Hardy Elementary School, Booker T. Washington High School, Central High School, and Bishop College. She was married to Henry Carl Martin, of which this union produced 3 children: Virginia Louis Dunn, Carolyn Marie Smith, and Burnie Louis Martin. She has 9 grandchildren. The marriage to Martin ended in divorce.

Lee Quency served as a choir member and Sunday school teacher at Mt. Zion Baptist Church in Ft. Worth. She also served as a choir member and W.M.U president at Highland Park Baptist Church. In the original West Texas District Association she was president of Business and Professional Women’s Conference and treasurer of the Women’s Convention.

Lee Quency was married to Rev. J.D. Green, December 17, 1972. About her husband she fondly says, “ I thank God for him. He is a good husband and a wonderful man”. He was the pastor of New Hope Baptist Church, and she was a Sunday school teacher.

In Northeast Texas District Association, she was president of the Minister’s Wives Conference, and instructor in the School of Mission. In Texas Baptist State Convention she is VP of the Minister’s Wives Conference. She was active in many community and civic organizations. She retired from Golden State Mutual Life Insurance Company in January of 1977.

With an expression of thankfulness, she remarks,” My time is now spent doing what I can for others and enjoying the blessings of the Lord”.


Lee Omia Broadous Clegg

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Lee Omia BroadousClegg has a twin brother Leon. They are the 15th and 16th of the 19 children born to Rev. Z and Mrs. Mattie Thomas Broadous. Born in Texarkana, Arkansas she grew up in the rural community of Harrison Chapel.

Lee Omia describes many experiences on the farm. She talked about working in the fields. She remembers the watermelons they raised. She recalled the 4-H club in the neighborhood, how they would work hard to try and raise prize calves and pigs to go to the Extension Short course in Pine Bluff, Arkansas.

Lee Omia says that the last six children in the family were sort of a group of their own. This group consists of Lee Quency, Leon, Thelma, Therman, and John who is the youngest of all. Since Lee Quency was the oldest, she was the leader. “We thought she could do anything. She wasn’t scared of anything, she was a protector, and we had fun growing up”.

She remembers growing up in Harrison Chapel Baptist Church where she accepted Christ and was Baptized. She attended Hardy School and went on to Morris Booker Memorial in Dermott, AR. While there, she attended Ash Street Baptist Church where she served until she moved to Little Rock, AR. There she became a member of MT. Zion Baptist Church and attended Philander Smith College. She became a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority.

Lee Omia moved to Portland in 1943. In Portland she attended Mt. Olivet Baptist Church. Consequently, again in 1943 she moved to Los Angeles, California. There she married LeGrand H. Clegg JR. Born to this union are six children. Lee Omia educated all six of her children herself and they are all professionally employed. When asked how she did it, she said confidently, “I could not have done it by myself, but faith in God who can make all things possible, prayer and hard work.”

Lee Omia resided in California for 40 years. She was been employed by the Los Angeles Council of Churches; The Willowbrook School District; Compton Union High School District. Lee Omia was active in many civic and community organizations. She was a member of Friendship Charity Circle of Los Angeles Council of Churches, The National Council of Negro Women, The Booster Club of Centennial High School, The Parent and Teacher Association. In 1960 she was the recipient of an Honorary Life Membership in the Parent Teacher Association.

Lee Omia was also active in religious work. She was a member of the Pilgrim Missionary Baptist Church of Los Angeles for 40 years. She served as Sunday school instructor, and member of the Young Matrons and The Ruth Circle. She served as an instructor of Christian Education with the Youth Summer Program at Grace Temple Missionary Baptist Church of Los Angeles. She also traveled extensively throughout the United States.

 


Leon Broadous Sr.

Biography of Leon Broadous, Sr. 1916-1985

On January 24, 1916, the Lord blessed Rev Z. and Mattie Broadous, Sr. with their second set of twins.  A daughter, Lee Omia and a son, Leon.

They couldn’t have known that even though Leon wouldn’t become a minister as most of his brothers would eventually become, he too would deeply touch the lives of hundreds of people.

Leon began his formal education at Harrison Chapel School which was housed in the church his father built and organized.  Due to a need to help the family, he left school to work after competition of the third grade.  His strong desire for an education for person satisfaction and to inspire his children prompted him to enroll in night school. While working days and raising his six children and supporting his wife, he obtained his G.E.D. in Portland, OR.

 

As a child Leon got enjoyment in raising animals.  He often entered his prized pig and calf in local contests.  During his childhood he accepted the Lord Jesus Christ as his Savior.  He was baptized in a muddy creek near his home in Texarkana, Arkansas by his father. 

 

Leon later met and married Ora Lee Gibson in April 1939.  There were blessed with six children, two sons: Leon, Jr. and James.  4 daughters: Dorothy Leola, Martha Louise, Wanda Lois, and Katherine Lavern.


His love for his wife and children, plus a desire for a better life, led him to eventually move to the state of Oregon.  He arrived in Portland in 1945.  He worked in the Portland shipyard for a short time and then returned home to Arkansas only to come back to Portland for a final stay in 1951. 

 

Blessed with an upbringing to believe in one’s own self, Leon was not content until he eventually became his own employer.  While working at Starr Construction, he was able to finally open a service station “Broadway Golden Eagle” in 1956.  He and the family operated the business until he built his still existing business, “Broadous Auto Service”.

 

Throughout his years in business, Leon was able to provide employment for many children and adults

 

In 1951 Leon united with Vancouver Ave. First Baptist Church, and continued to serve the Lord as one of God’s Chosen.  He worked with The Brotherhood and other organizations within his own church and other churches throughout the city of Portland.  Leon’s mission for Christ and his first love as a “Doorkeeper in the House of the Lord” (Usher), would be his best-known service in the Army of the Lord.  He dedicated his life uplifting ushering.  He spent much of his time and efforts re

Biography of Leon Broadous, Sr. 1916-1985

 

On January 24, 1916, the Lord blessed Rev Z. and Mattie Broadous, Sr. with their second set of twins.  A daughter, Lee Omia and a son, Leon.

 

They couldn’t have known that even though Leon wouldn’t become a minister as most of his brothers would eventually become, he too would deeply touch the lives of hundreds of people.

 

Leon began his formal education at Harrison Chapel School which was housed in the church his father built and organized.  Due to a need to help the family, he left school to work after competition of the third grade.  His strong desire for an education for person satisfaction and to inspire his children prompted him to enroll in night school. While working days and raising his six children and supporting his wife, he obtained his G.E.D. in Portland, OR.

 

As a child Leon got enjoyment in raising animals.  He often entered his prized pig and calf in local contests.  During his childhood he accepted the Lord Jesus Christ as his Savior.  He was baptized in a muddy creek near his home in Texarkana, Arkansas by his father. 

 

Leon later met and married Ora Lee Gibson in April 1939.  There were blessed with six children, two sons: Leon, Jr. and James.  4 daughters: Dorothy Leola, Martha Louise, Wanda Lois, and Katherine Lavern.


His love for his wife and children, plus a desire for a better life, led him to eventually move to the state of Oregon.  He arrived in Portland in 1945.  He worked in the Portland shipyard for a short time and then returned home to Arkansas only to come back to Portland for a final stay in 1951. 

 

Blessed with an upbringing to believe in one’s own self, Leon was not content until he eventually became his own employer.  While working at Starr Construction, he was able to finally open a service station “Broadway Golden Eagle” in 1956.  He and the family operated the business until he built his still existing business, “Broadous Auto Service”.

 

Throughout his years in business, Leon was able to provide employment for many children and adults

 

In 1951 Leon united with Vancouver Ave. First Baptist Church, and continued to serve the Lord as one of God’s Chosen.  He worked with The Brotherhood and other organizations within his own church and other churches throughout the city of Portland.  Leon’s mission for Christ and his first love as a “Doorkeeper in the House of the Lord” (Usher), would be his best-known service in the Army of the Lord.  He dedicated his life uplifting ushering.  He spent much of his time and efforts recruiting followers for Christ and Ushers for the church.  Leon worked so faithfully as an Usher while services as President of the District Ushers for more than 10 years.  He also worked with ushers in the National Baptist Congress and Convention.  He also received a National Plaque of Recognition for his relentless service in the church.  First in his state and then nationally from the president of the convention.

 

Leon was blessed with a special gift to relate to all people.  He put himself above no one, nor below anyone.  Everyone knew they could confide in him for trust and he always had time for anyone, no matter how busy he was.  He always had a smile and a kind word for all and he loved to make people laugh.  He enjoyed all pranks such as sneaking food off other’s plates, hiding silverware in someone else’s purse or pocket while accusing someone else.  Hiding someone’s shoes anywhere.   He always had a trick for all occasions. 

cruiting followers for Christ and Ushers for the church.  Leon worked so faithfully as an Usher while services as President of the District Ushers for more than 10 years.  He also worked with ushers in the National Baptist Congress and Convention.  He also received a National Plaque of Recognition for his relentless service in the church.  First in his state and then nationally from the president of the convention.

 

Leon was blessed with a special gift to relate to all people.  He put himself above no one, nor below anyone.  Everyone knew they could confide in him for trust and he always had time for anyone, no matter how busy he was.  He always had a smile and a kind word for all and he loved to make people laugh.  He enjoyed all pranks such as sneaking food off other’s plates, hiding silverware in someone else’s purse or pocket while accusing someone else.  Hiding someone’s shoes anywhere.   He always had a trick for all occasions. 

 

 

 

 

Thelma Broadous Williams

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“The first remembrance of myself in this beautiful world was on bright fall day, evidently the older brothers and sisters had dug sweet potatoes that day, for I remember my twin brother Therman and me riding on top of the potatoes in a wagon. Now, whether it was the same day or when, but I remember me and my twin trying to carry a large potato down the trail. It was too heavy for us and Mother came to our rescue.

From the first day of my school life, I was made to feel inferior in my class to my twin brother. Our teacher always spoke highly of him. I was always trying to compete with him. I was tom-boyish most of my childhood. We were born December 14, 1917. I got here first.

I was always seemingly the leader and organizer of my Peer groups. (4-H Club; Entertainments; Box Suppers; Sports etc.) My nickname was “Tob” and “Sis. Mitchell”.

If the kids of the community (girls) wanted to go to any activities or something special, if there were no grown-ups going, the kids couldn’t go unless I was going. I remember mama telling me one night what an honor it was that the community ladies trusted me as they did.

On our way from school one evening in a rain flood, Tony Floyd fell in the very deep water along the roadside. It seemed that he was about to drown. All the school kids were jumping up and laughing, I couldn’t swim, but I jumped off into the water and saved him. I became the heroine of the community. As an award for my bravery, Aunt Millie gave me a rabbit fur coat.

One summer I had to walk to Mandiville every day with Jessie to school. I was a little squirt. Everyone said I looked just like Sis.  Jessie said if I grew taller we would pass for twins. I wanted to grow fast so I could look like her twin. So every evening I would go to the horse lot and rub my legs in fertilizer to make me grow faster. Look at us now, it paid off!

The remembrance of Bro. Z riding ‘ole Dan Pat’ was one of the impressive things of my childhood on the farm too. I thought he was a shining knight. Nobody could ride ole Dan like Brother Z. When Z visited home once from Marshall, Texas wearing a pretty pair of tan leather leggings shining like new money, my little heart melted. My big brother was the best looking man in town.

I spent a great part of my childhood trying to figure out why my brothers plowed with mules and horses and Mr. Oliver Floyd across the fence plowed with oxen that I thought were cows. Papa chewed tobacco. To make me some money, when he would buy a plug of tobacco, I would cut a small plug, hide it, and when he ran out I would sell it to him for a few pennies or a nickel.

The nicest thing about breakfast in my childhood was waiting for Papa to finish breakfast so I could drink his leftover coffee. One year I was growing up very fast, Papa and Mama said my growth was good for the new crops. I planted all the whipperwill peas in the corn field. The night before planting watermelons, Papa briefed me to get up early the next morning, not to say a word to anyone until after the fields were planted. The crop yield was plentiful that year.

Mama inspired me to try to understand the Scriptures and memorize verses. At meal time she would often repeat; “ and when they saw the star they rejoiced with exceeding great joy”. I wanted to learn and say it just like Mama and I eventually did. I remember the little red back New Testament we read from each Sunday around the breakfast table. My first hymn of meaning was given out by Papa. “A charge to keep I have”.

Mrs. Matilda Roberts was my Beginners Sunday School teacher. I remember her saying, “If you have a task to do, do it willingly then it won’t be so hard to do”.

To respect the things of others was gotten across to me loud and clear by my brother Leon. He went fishing, caught 2 little catfish, cleaned them, and was about to sit down to eat them, but was asked by mama to go to the well and draw some water first. While he was gone I ate the fish. Believe me I felt his wrath. He promised that every time he saw me he would do the same (beat me).

Well all of this was in growing up. We had a big family of love and happiness. We are all now parents, and grandparents, and some of us are great grandparents. We grew up in a Christian home. I was the last of the children to accept Christ. Now I love and trust Him completely.

I would like to think that I too have made a contribution to Society. I attended and graduated from Hardy Elementary School in our community. I then went on to attend and receive my degree from America Baptist Theological Seminary in Nashville, TN.

I was married to Earnest Smith, who passed away. I have a son Robert Preston Broadous, and grandson Danyene. I was later married to Rev. A Williams, who was pastor of Saint James Baptist Church in Texarkana. I worked closely by his side in the church. Some of my other work consists of being a Missionary for Ozan Baptist District Association, Organizer of the Stewardship Auxillary of Ozan District Association, was President of Baptist Minister’s Wives Conference, Dean of Women in the Regular Arkansas Baptist State Convention, President and Organizer of Mission Fellowship Outreach of Texarkana. I have received a number of citations for leadership, organizer, promoter and outstanding services in both religious and civic work.


Therman Broadous

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Reverend Therman Broadous is the 18th of the 19 children born to Rev. Z and Mrs. Mattie Thomas Broadous. Therman and his twin sister Thelma were born December 15, 1917 in Texarkana, Arkansas. According to Therman, Thelma is older. He says she got here first. Asked about his home life he said, we had fun growing up. Of course in a large family you know everything wasn’t always peaches and cream, but we had a good life.

Therman remembers working in the fields chopping and picking cotton, growing potatoes, peanuts, corn, peas and cane. He says they made syrup from the cane. He recalls that there were six of us that were close together. We were the last of the clan. Lee Quency was the oldest of this group, then there was Lee Omia and her twin brother Leon, my twin sister Thelma and John who is the youngest of all. We had our quarrels and scrambles, but love still existed. Therman says he was the flippant one and the others called him mannish. His peers in the community called him “clean”.

He recalls he was changing from one mood to another, whatever he thought he could get away with. For instance, he suddenly decided one day that he didn’t like biscuits so the girls had to make corn bread for him each meal. What the family didn’t know was, he was stealing biscuits behind their backs. But Mama, he continued, “found me out”. She was trying to catch a chicken one evening. I came through the yard with an arm full of stove wood. I carried the wood into the kitchen and there on the stove were all those golden brown biscuits. Just as I came out with a biscuit in my hand, and my hand in what I thought was a pocket, which proved not to be. Mama asked me to catch the chicken she wanted. I proceeded to do so, one hand and biscuit in my britches and the other hand reaching for the chicken. Then Mama hollered at me “Boy, get your hand out of your pocket and catch that chicken”. When I took my hand out, the biscuit fell to the ground…You guess what happened.

I accepted Christ and grew up in the Harrison Chapel Baptist Church. Papa organized this church and was its pastor for a time.

A horrible experience in my yound adulthood happened when I was 18 years old. I was working for McClure’s Dairy. An explosion occurred that left me with serious burns that covered more than 50% of my body. I was in the hospital 28 days. When I returned home I was a pitiful sight. I remember Mama had gone somewhere one day and Lee Quency made dinner and she sat me off in a place to eat because they couldn’t stand to look at me while they were eating. Mama came home and saw what was going on. Of course you can guess what happened to Lee Quency.

I married the first time when I was 22 years old. My wife Velma and I had our first daughter Bernardean. I met and married Gladys Fields Broadous in 1962. Our children are: Bernardean, Barbara, Linda, Bernice, Vanessa, Deborah, William, Timothy, Zelos, and John.

Therman attended Hardy school for elementary school. He attended high school at Rosenwald High School in Wilton, Arkansas. He attended college at Langston University in Oklahoma. He also served in the U.S Army in World War II.

He answered his call to ministry in August of 1962. He was licensed to preach the gospel in September, 1962. He became a Pastor in 1963. He served at Metropolitan Baptist Church in Muskogee, Oklahoma.

Rev. Therman Broadous served as Secretary of Eufaula Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance for 10 years. He served as Member of the Board of Directors of Eufaula Lake Ministry for 16 years. He served as President of the Ministers and Deacons Union of Collate District, Oklahoma for 4 years. He served as President of the Congress of Christian Education of Collate District, Oklahoma for 8 years. He served as Vice-President of State Pastors Conference of Oklahoma Baptist State Convention for 10 years. He was a member of the Board of Educational Development Foundation, and Oklahoma Baptist State Convention for 6 years. He served as President of the N.A.A.C.P in McIntosh County for 10 years and Executive Director of C.C.C. Educational Foundation of Oklahoma for 10 years.


John Henry Broadous

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Reverend John Henry Broadous was born March 1, 1920 in Texarkana, Arkansas to the parents of Reverend and Mrs. Z Broadous. His Mother’s name was Mattie. He is the youngest child born of 19 children; 9 girls and 10 boys. He also bears the longest name, John Henry Pershing Broadous. When he was growing up everyone called him Pershing.

John lived in the state of Arkansas and was a farmer until the year 1942, attending Hardy Grade School in Arkansas. He entered the Military in April of 1942, and gained the rank of Sergeant First Class. John spent 3 years overseas in the European theatre in the Armed Forces, and was Honorably Discharged October 31, 1945.

John then moved to L.A in December of 1945. He attended Jefferson High School in L.A, and in 1947 completed his studies at Merit High School in Oakland. He married his wife, Jean on March 10th of 1947, and moved to Berkeley in August of 1947. There he worked as a carpenter at the Navy Supply Center in Oakland and San Francisco.

In 1950 John was called to active duty, and served in the Korean War until 1952. In December 1953 John moved back to L.A and pursued the field of construction as a carpenter. The young man was driven by a variety of talents. He graduated from “American Barber College” after which he practiced as Master Barber. He owned and operated a barbershop called “J&L Barbershop”, and a record shop called “Jean’s Record Shop”. He owned and operated Jean’s Café” on 2nd and Los Angeles Streets, the only black café in the heart of downtown Los Angeles.

John worked for the City of Los Angeles as a carpenter, and for the State of California Division of Highways as an Auto Service Foreman. In 1962 he received recognition and a monetary award from Governor Edmund G. Brown and achievements in rearranging and establishing the Motor Service Dept. for the State of California.

John accepted the call to ministry in 1962. He became Pastor of New Hope Baptist Church from 1968 to 1971. It was at this time he accepted the call and challenge to the Grace Temple Baptist Church with a membership of 9. He is a student and graduate of both Los Angeles Bible College and Redd College of Christian Religion, also attended Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena.

On September 27, 1972, John was hospitalized for 10 months. As a result of his illness he was paralyzed from the waist down for almost 2 years. One year of his life was spent in a wheelchair preaching and teaching God’s word when miraculously God healed his body and delivered him from paralysis.

On July 27, 1972 John led the church into its newly purchased edifice at 7017 S. Gramercy Place in Los Angeles. John was a strong and dedicated leader, who ministered to the whole man, he was community minded and Christ centered, strongly advocating the oneness of the believer and total involvement of his church family.

His church owned and operated a Child Development Center where working mothers could place their children while they worked. He helped young people by offering them summer jobs. John considered himself blessed beyond measure. The Lord has given him and his wife Jean 4 beautiful children. God allowed him to give each of his children a college education, and all four hold high positions in society. All four are born again believers in Jesus Christ.


Mattie Banks Williams Allen

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Mattie Banks Williams Richardson Green Allen was born on September 12, 1886 to the parents of Edmond and Lucy Banks in Cotton Valley (Minden), Louisiana. Mattie was the 10th of 12 children.

Mattie’s grandfather, Sam Banks had moved from Alabama when he was a young man. He settled in Minden, Louisiana near Knuckles Fort. In those days the slaves took the name of their master but Sam did not like the name Knuckles so he took the name of a general from the confederate army which was Banks.

After the surrender Sam purchased his master’s property that included 300 acres. Sam was able to pay for the property by exchanging bales of cotton. At this location, Edmund and Lucy raised their family of 12 children. Mattie Banks Allen and all of her sisters and brothers attended school. Several completed college and became teachers.

Mattie confessed Christ as her savior at the age of 9 which started a Christian journey of over 90 years for her. Mattie had a happy childhood and her love for children stems from those days when she lived at home.

When Mattie went away to boarding school, the rules were strict, she remembers her first date. In those days, the younger girls wore short dresses. You were allowed to only go out with the boys if you wore long dresses. This one night Mattie borrowed a long dress from a friend so she could go on a date, but when the matron saw her with the long dress on she would not allow Mattie to go out with the boy because in the past she never wore long dresses.

Mattie married her childhood sweetheart November 10, 1910 to this union was born one son and one daughter. She married a second and third time, the third time was to a minister with 5 children. She reared her step-children successfully and sent them to college.

Mattie married her last husband after he had courted and wooed her by mail, mostly he made her and offer she could not refuse. They were married in Arizona during the early sixties and lived happily together working in the church until his death in 1973.

Mattie has been involved with her church activities such as the choir, missionary society, NAACP, and more. Mattie had a lovely warm home that she shared with many people. All are encouraged to visit, have meetings, see the animals, eat, and reminisce.

Mattie Banks Allen you are a Legend in your own time. You have lived a Rich, Full, and Blessed life. You have many children, grandchildren, adopted children, nieces, nephews, and a host of friends and other relatives who love and cherish you. Your sense of humor, memory, alertness, and love of the Lord has been an inspiration to all.

 


Eddie & Lucy Banks

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Parents of Mattie Banks Williams Allen

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